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Vin65 Blog

Welcome to the Vin65 blog.  We are using this space to try and convey our little piece of insight into winery websites, POS systems, and best practices to sell more wine.

Corinna Johnson
 
April 8, 2014 | Corinna Johnson

3 Ways To Get Quality Customer Data

Nurturing relationships with your customers is critical for growing a successful business. Problem is, not everyone wants personal relationships with businesses. Develop trust with your customer in order to open up the information-sharing floodgates.

What can you do to connect with your customer on a personal level? Have you trained your staff to ask the right questions? Do you make notes in your CRM each time you interact with a customer? Are you collecting good data, but using it ineffectively?

Here are 3 ways to get quality data and use it effectively:

1. Ask Only What You Need

People get annoyed when they’re asked for irrelevant information; so less is definitely more. What will you do with the data you’re collecting? All of the data in the world is useless if you aren’t applying it in a way that personally impacts your customers.

Start with the basics: name, email and mailing address. You can market directly to them, add a bit of customization and contact them should there be a problem with their order.

2. Show How It Benefits The Customer

Up to 60% of consumers will pay more for a better customer experience. (Source: desk.com).

Are you collecting data to reward loyal customers? People are more willing to give up information if it means a promo code or loyalty reward will be in their inbox. Be transparent and let them know what the information is for.

Source: http://blog.kissmetrics.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/transparency.jpg

3. Share The Data Back

Everyone knows they are being tracked online. People trust private companies more because they think they’re monitoring the data for a purpose. For example, Amazon makes recommendations for products you may like based on recent purchase history or product searches. It helps you find the products you’re interested in, so it’s a win-win.

Conclusion

Use data to help your customers buy more wine from your site. Develop metrics to improve customized marketing and impress visitors, build their trust, and move them up the permission ladder. Work on curating quality data and then find strategies to market effectively to your clients. They’ll appreciate the extra effort!

 

Corinna Johnson
 
March 11, 2014 | Corinna Johnson

4 Reasons To Develop Your Wine Ratings

Product reviews are good for business. Reviews give your product a human level of interaction and are a powerful convincer for the savvy consumer. When’s the last time you bought something from Amazon and didn’t read at least the first couple of reviews?

By developing reviews for your wine, you’re attracting new customers, because reviews increase conversions. Here’s why:

1. 92% Of Consumers Trust Peer Reviews

It’s no secret that the success of many websites is attributed to peer reviews. Consumers have had to block out marketing noise for years now. Sites like Airbnb have exploded on the scene as people have made an untrustworthy concept (staying at a stranger’s house) into a brilliant travel alternative (non-hotel pricing with an authentic, local experience). Peer reviews that are honest and compelling builds trust in your brand. Over half of Millennials (consumers aged 18 to 34) trust the opinions of strangers online over those of friends and family. (Social Trends Report 2012).

2. They Make Your Products Credible

You think your wine is great. We bet your winemaker does, too. What makes your product credible is that other people like it enough to actually take the time to review it. It’s honest and posting reviews on your site show that you are confident in your wine.  84% of millennials say user-generated content has at least some influence on what they buy (compared to 70% of Boomers). (Bazaarvoice 2012).

3. Makes You Pay Attention To Your Biggest Fans

This is the classic example of give and take. People take the time to review your wine, so you should reward them with something. Thank them, give them a shout-out on social media, or email them a promo code. After all, 4.7% of your customers generate 100% of your social referrals. (Engage Sciences 2013).

4. Allows You To Handle Negative Reviews Like A Champ

Scared of getting negative reviews? Don’t be! Negative reviews actually make your wine reviews more credible. Consumers will take the bad with the good (as long as there’s more good than bad). Reevoo research has found that  68% of consumers trust reviews more when they see both good and bad scores, and shoppers who go out of their way to read bad reviews convert 67% more than the average consumer.

Be responsive to dissatisfied customers because 95% of dissatisfied customers will do business with a company again if their complaint is resolved quickly, according to TARP Worldwide. Think of a time when you’ve been unhappy with a product or service. Doesn’t great customer service usually leave you feeling better about the brand than you did originally? Responding to negative reviews can make dissatisfied customers connect with you and your winery on a whole new level.

Tips On Getting Product Reviews:

1. Offer Incentives

2. Send follow-up emails after purchases

3. Just ask!


Now, go get some reviews!

Time Posted: Mar 11, 2014 at 8:00 AM
Brent Johnson
 
January 6, 2014 | Brent Johnson

4 Ways Your Buttons Can Increase Conversion

The ‘Add-To-Cart’ or ‘Buy’ button is essential if you want to sell wine on your website. Things like the colours, size, font, and location of these buttons play a very large factor subconsciously for a website visitor and will dictate whether or not they buy from you. Below are four factors that will change your conversion rates.

Colour

The aesthetics of a button, specifically the colour, can change the conversion rate. It’s a very simple change to sell more online and we often see designers talk wineries into making the wrong choice simply because a certain button colour fits the design style guide. Don’t be fooled, the colour of buttons matters; you should look for designers that get that.

Red will raise the heart rate, yellow draws the eye quickly (which is why Amazon.com uses it) but orange is ‘said’ to be one of the most successful add to cart button colours. Research shows that an orange button increases engagement by 5%. On most sites it's enough to stand out without looking out of place. It is also the closest you can get to red without the colour subconsciously screaming warning.

Look at your site’s call to action button colours and ask yourself, why am I using this colour? Is it White, Black or Gray because the designer thought it would match the website even though those colour make it the hardest for the customer to find the buttons (yes, black isn’t a colour, it’s a shade - but it depends if you define colour from light or from pigment).

After you’ve looked at your website, take a look at KISSmetrics’s psychology of button colour infograph (the graphic above is from their post).

Placement

Where the button shows on a page is even more important than the colour. The button needs to be some place visible and in a predominate place on the page. It should always be above the fold (note that the fold is no longer just for desktop computers, but for mobile devices and tablets). You won’t see an ecommerce site put a button above the product, but you’ll see them put it on the right or left hand side of products.

Below are two examples, one of Zappos and Poplar Grove with the buttons on the right; both are well designed sites selling a lot online and both have the button in a location that is easy for the consumer to find.

Text

Be mindful of the buttons text. If the placement and colour are right, but the wording is bad all the other work is for nothing. Make your button stand out on your page. You want your font to be legible, clearly standing out from the button colour and using title case, not ALL CAPS (it’s much easier and faster to read). As far as what text you use, ‘Add to Cart’ has had a better track record for conversions than ‘Buy Now’ and you’ll see that most internet retailers use 'Add-To-Cart' text within their purchase buttons.

Here are some stats on the text used within the call to action/purchase buttons on over 100 top ecommerce sites (thanks to GetElastic):

58% - Add to Cart
9.8% - Add to Bag
9.8% - Add to Shopping Bag
6.3% - Add to Basket
4.5% - Add to Shopping Cart
2.7% - Buy
1.8% - Buy Now
1.8% - Add Item(s) to Cart
0.9% - Add Item(s) to Bag
0.9% - Add to My Bag
0.9% - Add to My Brown Bag
0.9% - Add to My Shopping Cart
0.9% - Order Now

Size

Size matters.

Too big and it could become counterproductive, looking out of place, or causing people to have ‘banner blindness’ which leades consumers to glaze over the call to action. Too small and it will make it hard for consumers to buy that wine.

The dimensions of the button and how it compares to the other elements on the page is key. Below are examples of a good 'dimensional relationship' between buttons and the product page.

Conclusion

Your button design influences your conversion rate whether you like it or not and it’s easy to make changes. Try out a change for 3 months and see if your conversions increase. If your colour, text, placement and size are right you’ll notice the difference.

Time Posted: Jan 6, 2014 at 6:30 AM
Brent Johnson
 
September 19, 2013 | Brent Johnson

5 Holiday Preparation Tips For Your Website

Whether you’re ready for it or not, October, November and December (OND) is rapidly approaching. It’s a good time for wineries to start planning and executing marketing campaigns on their websites.

Both Black Friday and Cyber Monday mark the start of the holiday shopping season for millions of shoppers online. Here are 5 great ways to get your website ready for the holidays:
 

1) Create A Shipping Calendar

Statistically, I’m not the only consumer out there that puts off Christmas shopping until the last minute and with online purchases consumers need to be reminded of shipping times so the present makes it under the tree by Christmas morning.

If I buy wine from you will it make it to my house for Christmas, New Years, or later?

Offer a clear/simple shipping calendar throughout your website to make it easy for consumers (like me) to know if we’re going to make the deadline. There are some key areas on your site to place the calendar such as the header in the product list page and detail pages, as well as the cart and the checkout screens.

The example above from American Eagle quickly shows key dates to order before to get that gift under the tree by the 24th.

I’ve been both the giver and recipient of gifts that have arrived late and neither are fun. Work with your shipper to make a calendar that's simple so your consumers know the cut off dates.
 

2) Curate & Make a Gift Guide

It’s all about giving gifts during the holiday season and you want to make it as easy as possible for consumers to pick out something from your store. Your purchasers might be buying for their parents, a co-worker, or a friend, and might not know their taste in wine, so it’s your job to make it easy for them.

Use tools like product badges/callouts (like the one below), highlighting consumer ratings and reviews, or create pre-made packages to remove the guessing from the purchase.

 

Amazon does this really well, shown in the image below, by suggesting different categories or gift ideas for each type of person you’ll be buying for.


 

3) Black Friday / Cyber Monday Promotions

During the holidays consumers expect to see some type of sale and this is especially true on Black Friday and Cyber Monday. If you don’t offer a sale it is like telling your customers to go buy somewhere else.

Some examples of successful promotions are shipping discounts, or volume incentives. At this point, consumers expect free shipping for orders over $100 (technically ‘shipping included’ in the wine industry).

Start emailing your consumers early to let them know when the promotions will be running and give them something to anticipate on your site. We see some bigger ecommerce sites sending holiday emails for promotions but not letting the consumer know that the actual promo will not be in effect until a specific day. This gives them something to look forward to and a reason to visit the website rather than reading and discarding the email.
 

4) Plan Ahead - Schedule Your Emails

Create your emails and offers ahead of time and schedule to send them at specific times. Think about the key days your winery should be ready for (don’t leave it to the day before Black Friday). Below is a breakdown of the months leading up to the holidays with key dates and great ideas for email blasts:

October

  • Key Dates:
    • 14th - Plan your Halloween marketing.
    • 31st - Halloween. Start to ramp up holiday messaging.
  • Common Email Themes:
    • Shop pre-holiday items
    • Pre-order holiday’s hottest items
    • Preview the holiday collections
    • Sign up for holiday savings

November

  • Key Dates:
    • 1st - Plan your Thanksgiving/Black Friday deals and marketing.
    • 29th - Black Friday
  • Common Email Themes:
    • Pre-Black Friday deals
    • Specialized gift guides
    • Free/Included shipping
    • Holiday gift tips

December

  • Key Dates:
    • 2nd - Cyber Monday
    • 6th - Start a ‘12 Days of Christmas’ campaign
    • 23rd - eGift cards only
    • 26th - After Christmas sale
  • Common Email Themes:
    • Last minute gifts
    • Order-by deadlines
    • Season’s greetings
    • After Christmas promotions

January

  • Key Dates:
    • 1st - Happy New Year messaging.
    • 6th - Take down any holiday images
  • Common Email Themes:
    • Redeem your gift cards
    • Self gifts (get what you really wanted)
       

5) Have Some Fun!

Don’t take yourself, or your website, so seriously. Have fun with the holiday on your website and emails. Throw in a Santa hat, elf, reindeer, etc. somewhere on your site or add in a snowflake or two. This shows that your company has personality and that your website actually gets updated (so it’s not the same website all year round).

Both Target and Amazon add holiday imagery to their sites and logos every year. Below is an example of Bath & Body Works' website during the Christmas season which shows holiday imagery throughout the site.

If you've tried any other holiday tricks or campaigns, or if you've seen a great example let us know how they've worked.

Time Posted: Sep 19, 2013 at 6:30 AM
Andrew Kamphuis
 
July 11, 2013 | Andrew Kamphuis

Connecting Social and Commerce

At Vin65 we see a lot of data from transactions, we’ve done a lot of experiments and we’ve seen some interesting results. For example:

  • Targeted email works better than mass email,
  • Discounted shipping works better than discounted price,
  • Add-To-Cart buttons on the wine list page converts more than the Add-To-Cart button on the wine drilldown page.

We’ve focused on analytics, A/B tests, and we look at BI tools to track data and improve tools and while this data is good, we don’t believe this it is good enough.

Social Meets Commerce

Today we are starting a whole new class of experiments are excited about learning a lot in completely different ways. Rather than looking at just the data, we’re going to start experiments with conversations consumers with each other and wineries.

I wish I could say linking a consumer’s social and ecommerce profiles together results in ‘X’ – but we are just in the beginning phase.  Let me tell you what I believe and what we experimenting with.

Know More Sell More

Knowing and understanding your consumers and acting on that data is what creates exceptional companies and I believe that the best way to know your customer is to have conversations with them. Knowing the POS and ecommerce data is not enough.  Just like peanut butter and jelly, I believe that ecommerce data combined with social data is a perfect match.

Imagine knowing that club members that are Facebook fan last 5 months longer than those who are not fans. Would that change the way you promote you Facebook page and how you use Facebook’s tools? What if you were instantly notified if your that a few people Tweeting you were your top consumers were reaching out on Tweeter. Would you engage them in a conversation?

At Vin65 the primary goal of this blog is education (how to sell the most wine online) for our customers and the wine industry as a whole.  We also don’t like to talk about tools we are building.  I realize I hijacked it – but I did want to lay out a vision of a few things we see in the future.

One Step Forward

At Vin65 we've partner with VinTank (the leading wine social media management company) and we’ve created a bi-direction integration linking social customers in VinTank with ecommerce customers in Vin65.

Inside VinTank - The next time someone is talking about you, the next time your looking at social conversations, you can see that persons lifetime value, club memberships, Vin65 contact type, etc.

Inside Vin65 - Your can use the list builder to segment on customers social, look at individual customers and see their social profile.

This is going to allow for a lot of great data meshing. I’m sure you, our customer, will drive a lot of what is to come.   

I would invite you to watch a video and learn more about our bi-direction integration with Vintank or request a demo.

I’d also love to hear what you would like to see with the meshing of social and ecommerce data.  What would help you sell more wine?

Time Posted: Jul 11, 2013 at 6:00 AM
Andrew Kamphuis
 
August 1, 2012 | Andrew Kamphuis

5 Tips for Effective Ecommerce Merchandising

Whether it's picking up a loaf of bread or a silk scarf for Grandma, merchandisers think carefully about how you navigate in store and what will grab your attention.  Merchandising has been effective for so long in retail, yet it hasn’t really come to a lot of winery websites. Just like going to a retail store, the way your online list page looks and flows is just as important.  

On your winery website, how you merchandise ultimately makes for an easier, quicker and more pleasant shopping experience for your customers.

1. Call-Outs & Badges

With so much choice available, retail merchandisers use call-outs as a way to grab attention in the aisles.  The same attention-grabbing addition can be made on your winery website to make it easier for customers to see featured products. 

2. Alternate Product Layouts

Retail merchandisers use end aisles and alternate product displays to call attention to certain products.  Consistency is great, but having alternative product layouts on the same page can capture attention and it works well to highlight particular products.

3. Grouping Products

Have multiple tiers of wine?  Show all your wines on one page, but group them into the tiers using colors, or alternate layout.   Grouping products really draws attention to each tier of wine.

4. Quick View Feature

Modern clothing retailers (like Gap.com) have used Quick View as a way to expose product detail without a visitor leaving the actual shopping page.  If you have a lot of wines on a page, and the customer is likely to navigate between several wines, a quick view feature allows your customers to see more product detail without leaving the list page.

Image 1 - Quick View rollover

Image 2 - Quick View feature 

5. Custom Gift Sets

Wine is the perfect gift.  If you're looking for a way to guide your customers through gifting wine, a custom gift set (such as the one suggested below) lets your customers easily customize a gift.

These small customization features (which are fast becoming standard in other industries) provide extra value to your customers and can help boost sales.

Remember, visitors to your site need to be wooed by a great, attention-grabbing user experience, that way they'll come back again.

Have you seen some great examples of merchandising on the web?  Feel free to leave them in the comments below.

Time Posted: Aug 1, 2012 at 8:00 AM
Josh Clysdale
 
February 7, 2012 | Josh Clysdale

4 Keys to an Effective Promotion Strategy

Whether it’s a TV show highlighting thrifty families using coupons, or an inbox full of retail store offers, consumers are becoming more "deal" conscious when selecting where they choose to shop. In a sea of conflicting prices and promotional offers what can help your offer rise and get noticed while others sink into the proverbial junk box? Let's take a look at 4 keys to an effective coupon or promo strategy for selling wine.

1. Carefully Word Your Promotion

The way you word your promotion will not only affect how consumers read it but also how they react to it, whether they purchase or not. When wording your promotion here are a few points to consider:

  • Most of us are familiar with retail stores who offer sales or scratch card discounts that offer a range of percentages, say 25%-50% off. Research shows that it is better to word your offer as saving "Up To 50%" off rather than a range, because consumers will feel they are more likely to save big with 50%, even though their chances are the same if it were 25%-50% off. 
  • Create limited time offers by having visible date ranges. Short promotions create a "now or never" urgency making customers feel that if they miss this offer, they might not get it again. 
  • Make sure that any wording, for example promo titles, that consumers will see in their shopping cart allow them to easily recognize which coupons they are saving on.

2. Select the Appropriate Offer Type

Percentage or dollar off offers work well to generate interest for new shoppers. Club discounts that are automatic and easy to use can help promote brand loyalty and boost club memberships. However there is one promotion type that appeals to all consumers…free shipping. For our American winery clients you need to word your promotion as "Shipping Included" for legal reasons.  

Here are a few compelling reasons why you should offer free shipping:

  • 43% of shoppers abandon their shopping carts when they find high shipping charges at checkout.*
  • 75% of shoppers prefer to shop with online merchants offering free shipping.*
  • 50% of shoppers indicated free shipping offers made it more likely they would shop online.*

*Statistics provided by Freeshipping.org

Shipping is just one more cost that a consumer is mentally factoring in while they shop online.  If you offer free shipping, it’s one less item you have to worry about. Customers are more likely to buy more, more often, when they don’t have to worry about additional costs.

3. Place Your Promotion Where It's Sure to Get Noticed

Make sure your offer gets noticed. Prominent places such as homepage pods or sliders make your offer visible to anyone visiting your ecommerce store. To target newsletter signups, why not add a promotion code to an automatic confirmation email giving a discount off their first order? For those offering frequent promotions, why not consider creating a page dedicated to showcasing your current offers? This will help to keep deal seekers looking for coupon codes on your site, training them to visit your site rather than searching Google for the latest deals.

4. Deliver What You Promise

Whatever your offer, make sure you test its functionality before you release it. Finding a broken promotion is disappointing and frustrating to a consumer, and may be perceived as a "bait & switch" tactic. You should let consumers know how and where to use coupon codes, and where they will see the discounts appear. Then just make sure your promotion works as described.

~~

Agree?  Disagree?  What promotions are working for you?

Time Posted: Feb 7, 2012 at 8:00 AM
Andrew Kamphuis
 
December 8, 2011 | Andrew Kamphuis

The right content strategy for your mobile site

Developing the correct content strategy for your mobile site can be a bit confusing. It's still early in the game and we are seeing consultants offer different strategies on what content belongs on a mobile website.

Should you limit content?

Should you limit the content displayed on the mobile version of your website? How about the number of products? Should that be limited?

Originally, our team here at Vin65 thought the answer should be yes. Mobile phone screen sizes are small, the 3G data speeds are slower than regular broadband, and customers visiting your mobile site typically want to do something quickly, such as calling your winery or locating your winery.

Now that our mobile platform is more than a 1.5 years old, the above answer should be "no". Here's why.

1) Users need to see your content.
16-20% of emails are opened on a mobile device (source). A customer opens your email on a mobile device, they click a link - where does that take them? Hopefully to a mobile optimized version of a page. Unfortunately, more often than not, mobile websites are built as a "light" version of a brand's site and the mobile content is an after-thought - and the email link doesn't work.

More than 350 million Facebook users access Facebook through their mobile device (source). People "like" and share your content all the time. Similar to the email scenario, users on mobile devices need to be able to click links and see the mobile version of that content. Unlike the email scenario, you can't control the links people are sharing and if you only have a "light" version of your mobile site, the shared links won't work.

2) Mobile is not a second class citizen.
The problem with limiting content on your mobile site is you now have two sites to manage. Every time you add a page to your regular site, you have to decide if you should add it to your mobile site. It's extra work, and you often forget or neglect the content on the mobile site. (Our first version of our mobile had two sets of page content and wineries constantly let the mobile site go stale).

So what is the correct strategy?

We recommend that all of your content, all of your products, everything on your primary website should also exist on your mobile site. Every URL on your primary site has to work from a mobile phone (you don't control what other people are sending out, linking to, etc). You create a page, you add a product, etc - it should just work on your mobile site. This way, if a customer on a mobile phone views an email, reads Facebook, clicks on a tweet, all of the links, pages, etc. will just work.

We also recommend that the navigation on your mobile site be different than your primary website. People who come directly to your mobile phone do so with purpose - primarily to call, get your address, or look up a product. Screen size on a mobile phone is limited, and you want to promote the content that people are most likely to be seeking on their mobile phone.

~~

Do you have a mobile optimized website? How do you decide what content to display?

Time Posted: Dec 8, 2011 at 8:00 AM
Andrew Kamphuis
 
December 5, 2011 | Andrew Kamphuis

3 Reasons Your Winery Needs a Mobile Website

One in four people are more prepared to share their toothbrush than their smart phone (source) and one-third of Americans are more willing to give up sex than their mobile phones (source).

There is no doubt that smart phones are changing the way we live. It's no surprise that major retailers have integrated mobile as part of their overall marketing strategy. But what about mobile for wineries? Is it important to have a mobile presence? How can this channel drive overall traffic and revenue? We believe that it is important and can drive traffic and revenue, here are three reasons why.

1) Mobile Traffic is Growing

According to StatsCounter, mobile traffic in North America is around 7.25% of all web traffic. It was only 1% three years ago. (source)

On our platform, which is specific to wineries, we are seeing over 10% of the traffic from mobile phones with several wineries in the 15-18% range. (If you want assistance calculating your percentage, it's really easy to do if you have Google Analytics installed - just ask us)

2) Your Regular Website isn't Going to Cut It

You only have to surf your regular website on a mobile phone to figure out it's probably not going to cut it. Flash photo galleries won't display on the iPhone and the performance is terrible on Android phones. You have to pinch and zoom to read the content. Adding something to your cart is next to impossible. It takes forever to load pages. The whole customer experience is terrible.

Visit your winery website on a mobile phone. Then visit a site like www.twistedoak.com, www.opusonewinery.com, or our demo site at  demo.vin65.com to see how a mobile optimized website should react.

3) Consumers are Buying Wine through Mobile Devices

In general, 50% of mobile phone owners are using their device to shop online or to assist while shopping in stores (source).

On our wine-ecommerce platform, we are seeing wine sales on mobile devices (however these sales do lag behind their respective traffic - for example if 10% of your traffic is on mobile, less than 10% of your ecommerce sales will be from mobile).  

We are seeing consumers viewing emails on their mobile phones (16% of them) or using Twitter or Facebook apps on their mobile phones. From these emails or from these apps, they click links to wines, and then view and purchase these wines on their mobile devices.

~~

As a winery, it's pretty easy to get a mobile website. Most of the major wine ecommerce platforms now offer a mobile solution and independent designers have more tools than ever to assist in building a mobile website. Most of the solutions are relatively cost effective and fairly easy to implement. It's a great opportunity to improve your customers experience and it's early enough that you can experiment a little before a mobile site is expected.

Mobile Webinar: At Vin 65, we are committed to the mobile channel as a source of additional revenue for your winery. Attend Brent Johnson's seminar on Mobile Made Easy, Wed Dec 7th at 9:30am PST and learn more.
Time Posted: Dec 5, 2011 at 9:00 AM
Andrew Kamphuis
 
October 10, 2011 | Andrew Kamphuis

Facebook Ecommerce - Will Customers Buy Wine on Facebook?

If you’re like most internet users, you start your day by checking Facebook and you probably check again at the end of the day. If you’re like our employees, you’re probably also checking Facebook at work. There are over 800 million active users on Facebook, and Facebook accounts for 1 in 5 pages accessed on the internet.

So Facebook has a large audience, but will this audience buy wine?  Here's 5 reasons I think they will.

1. Facebook already drives ecommerce traffic to your website.
There is some debate about whether Google or Facebook drives more traffic to a website, but it’s clear they are both key traffic sources. Facebook is the number one or number two driver of traffic to your ecommerce site. (Source / Source).

2. Facebook customers are good customers.
American Eagle found Facebook-referred visitors spend an average of 57% more money than non-Facebook-referred visitors. GiantNerd.com saw a 100% increase in revenue from Facebook within two weeks of adding the like button. There are several other Commerce Stats here. (Source)

3. Facebook is where your customers hang out.
There are more than 800 million active users on Facebook. More than 50% of users log onto Facebook in any given day. (Source)

4. Facebook is already a viable retail platform.
According to Booz Allen, there are $5 billion in goods being sold on Facebook in 2011. In the alcohol market, Social Commerce Today has a great story about Magners Cider and closer to California, wineries such as Silver Smith Vineyards are already selling wine on Facebook. (Source / Source / Source)

5. Facebook commerce is growing.
According to the same graph in number 4 above, Facebook commerce will be a $30 billion industry in 2015. (Source)

~~
At Vin65, we launched our Facebook Ecommerce App today. Show and sell your wine inside Facebook. Create custom Facebook fan pages. While there is a small setup fee, there is no additional monthly charge to our existing clients, and it’s fully integrated with our platform.

In developing this app, we stepped on the shoulders of other innovators including both Vintank Social Connect (Cruvee) and Social Candy who have developed great apps on Facebook.  

While I might have some bias, I really believe that Facebook commerce is here.  One of the key pieces for me in our Facebook Ecommerce App build was the addition of Google Analytics along with our reporting and dashboards. Like mobile and our iPad app, we’ll be watching closely as Facebook traffic grows and our Facebook ecommerce app evolves.

Check out some live examples and let us know what you think.
Demo Store: http://www.facebook.com/PineWines  
Ceja Vineyards: http://www.facebook.com/CejaVineyards
Twisted Oak: http://www.facebook.com/twistedoak

Time Posted: Oct 10, 2011 at 8:00 AM
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