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Vin65 Blog

Welcome to the Vin65 blog.  We are using this space to try and convey our little piece of insight into winery websites, POS systems, and best practices to sell more wine.

Andrew Kamphuis
 
March 10, 2009 | Andrew Kamphuis

Too many social links?

You see the links everywhere. Digg. Stumble. Add to Google. Redit. Del.icio.us.

It's clear that social media is here to stay. So how much social media should you put on your site? Will adding these buttons to your blog, to your content, or to your store bring you more visitors? More traffic? More sales?

Leading usability researches such as FutureNow, e-Consultancy, and others have done endless research on usability and e-commerce shopping. We've also done research in the wine industry.

As far as social media links, I've yet to see an research on the effectiveness of these links and I personally feel that the jury is still out but that studies are coming (and perhaps in the works right now)

Time Posted: Mar 10, 2009 at 9:04 PM
Andrew Kamphuis
 
March 8, 2009 | Andrew Kamphuis

How to choose a website/e-commerce provider.

There's been a great discussion on Open Wine Consortium about choosing an e-commerce platform. The discussion has been going on for almost a year and every so often the conversation sparks up again. (Right now it's six pages long)

These discussions often degrade into a platform feature comparison and what you can do on each platform. At Vin | 65 we offer one of the best all around feature sets for a winery (obviously I have a personal bias here). However I feel that comparing features is really the wrong way to go.

I firmly believe it has more to do with your developers and marketers than with the features itself. With a professional experienced developer you gain a lot of knowledge that you wouldn't necessary have yourself. (Just like having an experienced wine maker producing your wine)

So how should you choose an e-commerce platform? And what is the best deal?

  1. Compare the external sales you can achieve with each platform. Website design has a huge impact on sales. (Often the initial visit is all about the experience and story you tell) Marketing opportunities such as capturing visitor information, have an impact on sales. The website developer and marketers should be able to assist you here.
  2. Compare the internal costs you will save with each platform.  Which platforms are going to let you do your job more efficently. (This often comes down to which provider has the best features, and the easiest to use features)
  3. Compare the ongoing platform costs in terms of licensing fees, in terms of support, and how much time the platform will require from you.

If you want to get a whole lot of differing opinions, be sure to read the OWC thread.
 

Time Posted: Mar 8, 2009 at 8:03 PM
Andrew Kamphuis
 
March 1, 2009 | Andrew Kamphuis

The power of consumer reviews

The statistics are everywhere. Consumer reviews generate more sales.

I personally have had a few questions with clients and prospects about ratings and reviews, and in some of these conversations the client has been sceptical. The client has felt that a single bad rating can bring down the average or a negative review can turn off buyers. That's true if the glass is half empty.

A single bad rating can lend credibility to your product. When I look at reviews at Amazon and I see 19 good reviews and 1 bad review, it leads to credibility.

A negative review can turn buyers off, but it can also let you address a negative experience. Properly handling a negative experience shows class, and it can turn a person into a fan. (And if the consumer isn't telling you about their negative experience, you can bet they are telling their friends)

Don't fear the negative review.

Time Posted: Mar 1, 2009 at 10:34 PM
Andrew Kamphuis
 
February 23, 2009 | Andrew Kamphuis

The Missing Google Analytics Manual

Future Now Inc has published a great post titled 'The Missing Google Analytics Manual'.

We get a lot of Google Analytics questions - this is our new answer. (just kidding - we will still help you out)

Time Posted: Feb 23, 2009 at 10:02 PM
Andrew Kamphuis
 
February 21, 2009 | Andrew Kamphuis

Who takes care of the content?

Mike Duffy from The Winery Website Report wrote a nice little blog post this past week titled 'Thinking of Redesigning Your Winery Website?' where he links to a good article on 'Who takes care of the content'.

If you're planning a website the content plays a key role. So does photography (if you don't have a great photo next to your content, most people will just skip over the text). Website design, typography, 'call to action' phrases, button color, etc all play key roles.

At Vin|65 we have a set process we take our clients through:

  1. Discovery Process: we determine the goals of your website, setup bench marks to measure against, etc.
  2. Functional Requirements: we look at your current site, what your competitors are doing, determine the feature list, etc.
  3. Wireframes and Site Map: here we spend time deciding where the key elements need to appear, how much priority they should have, content needed, etc.
  4. Design Concepts: this is the fun part (and where to many web designers start)
  5. Etc…

People's personalities differ - some of our clients are really creative and love design, some of our clients are competitive and are really focused on the 'call to action' phrases. We do have some methodical clients that spend an incredible amount of time on content (we really have a client like this right now).

People can fall into a trap and choose a specific area on their site where they really want to focus, such as the creative, or the widgets, or at neat little Web 2.0 button, etc and because their personality type isn't attracted to other elements such as the content, they skip over those elements. (I'm guilty of this – I'm a competitive person, and I typically just skim text – I have to remember there are methodical people that really read all the text, and there are humanistic type of people that really like people pictures and testimonials, etc)

It's our job as web designers and developers to help balance our client and come up with great design, great content, and ultimately a great website.

Thoughts?

Time Posted: Feb 21, 2009 at 9:48 PM
Andrew Kamphuis
 
February 11, 2009 | Andrew Kamphuis

If your brand is being talked about how will you know?

A marketing firm down the street was in our office a month ago. They have a new beverage (non-wine) that is quite remarkable and for the last six months or so they have been marketing this product in the nutrition market space. The brand currently has a beautiful site, built primarily in flash, with some great photography and limited product information.

Before the meeting started, I did some quick research and noticed that this brand was being talked about in a lot of different forums. In fact I found at least 20 forums where this product was mentioned. Some of the comments were very positive, some were inquisitive, and there were some negative comments also (most of the negative comments were around the product not being found in local stores, or a rebate for a coupon not being received yet)

Unfortunately, the brand manager (who has been doing a great job getting the product into the retail market) had no idea that their brand was being talked about.

In this modern era, we are seeing more and more transparency in brands. It's not uncommon for a brand to have a blog and allowing customer comments. We are seeing brands have twitter accounts. Brands are opening up their websites for customer comments, reviews, etc.

The bottom line is: if you have a remarkable product, an average product, or a poor product, people are talking about you. If you don't allow user generated comments on your website, it won't stop the conversation.

This conversation can happen right on your website, where you can quite easily participate in the conversation (and this is the best place to have a conversation about your brand). This conversation will probably happen on other websites, where you can use monitoring tools, and probably participate in the conversation also.

Time Posted: Feb 11, 2009 at 11:39 PM
Andrew Kamphuis
 
February 8, 2009 | Andrew Kamphuis

Who's talking about you? Part 2

A couple of weeks ago I mentioned two tools to assist you in monitoring your brand on the web (and how to legally spy on your competitors).

While both the tools I mentioned (Google Alerts and Twitter Alerts) are great tools, these next two tools are far superior and offer a much more comprehensive solution.

Cruvee. Specifically focused on the wine industry, this is a great product that monitors your brand in wine blogs, twitter, forums, friend feeds, etc.  I've seen the demos, and this product is pretty cool.  Monitor and analyze your brand, what is being said about you, how it compares to your competitors, etc. 

Techrigy. This product also allows you to monitor your reputation and brand online. (It's been called Google Alerts on Steroids). I've set up Vin|65 with an account, and the reports look great, although I'm still just figuring it out.

 

Time Posted: Feb 8, 2009 at 10:57 PM
Andrew Kamphuis
 
February 8, 2009 | Andrew Kamphuis

The importance of being #1 on Google

On Friday the Google Blog offered a peak into some of the studies they are doing around their user interface.

This picture comes from an eye-tracking study that Google conducted. The deeper the color, the more a person's eyes focus on that part of the page.

Based on this image, all the focus is on the top two results. Coming up fifth or sixth on Google doesn't seem to garner much attention. It really pays to be number one or two.

--

As a side note, it's interesting to see that Google is constantly studying and testing their user interface. Too often a website is built and the interface is left alone for 2-3 years with no testing, tweaking, or continuous improvment.
 

Time Posted: Feb 8, 2009 at 8:59 PM
Andrew Kamphuis
 
February 5, 2009 | Andrew Kamphuis

What features are necessary on your website?

We are currently working on a social media / wine related website. Our designer is doing a great job of the interface, but I wonder if having too many features over complicates the main focus and goals of the site.

Consider the controls in these vehicles. Which of these two pictures represents  your website?

Does having more options represent a better website?

Time Posted: Feb 5, 2009 at 10:00 AM
Peter Andres
 
February 4, 2009 | Peter Andres

You Are Expected To Do It All!

As a small winery owner you are expected to do it all. You are running the big show. You are on the hook for the results.

Here is a shortened list of responsibilities:

  • Grow the grapes
  • Pick the grapes
  • Fix the tractor
  • Manage the workers
  • Make the wine
  • Ship the wine
  • Market the wine
  • Create a brand
  • Design the labels
  • Manage selling channels
  • Stay on top of compliance
  • Manage the website
  • Run the tasting room
  • Manage the books
  • Collect the money
  • Remember the customer is always right
  • Enjoy the lifestyle

As a web service provider we also like to add some, because if you have a web site you should also be doing these things:

  • SEO - Search Engine Optimization
  • Key word optimization
  • Managing organic search results
  • Managing paid search engine campaigns
  • Optimize your site for different visitor profiles
  • Run effective google ad campaigns and measure results
  • Measure conversion
  • Tweak your customers e-commerce experience
  • Know everything about Google Analytics
  • Create funnels to measure your sites effectiveness
  • Know some HTML and CSS
  • Keep up on product reviews and ratings
  • Put all your content into snooth.com and corkd.com
  • Get your facebook group going
  • Blog - What was that again?
  • vBlog - huh?
  • Twitter - come again?

My guess is that all the things that go into making the most of your web site and making your web site great fall between the cracks. Unless you are a larger winery who can afford to have a dedicated staff or multiple staff in the web department most of those web tasks simply don't get thought about, much less accomplished.

At Vin | 65 we are passionate about the web and making your sure your customers have a great experience buying your wine. We also bring a lot of experience and a great tool set to our customers so that they don't have to stress out about a lot of this stuff because it is built right in. We know our winery and wine retail customers are busy enough already. Let us be the web experts in your corner, so that you can focus on making amazing wine.

Want to know more about what we offer, how we can make your life easier, what the heck a blog is...contact us.

Time Posted: Feb 4, 2009 at 10:15 AM
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