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Andrew Kamphuis
 
March 1, 2011 | Marketing | Andrew Kamphuis

What makes a great wine marketing email?

Why are some emails opened and read while others are only glanced at and deleted?

During my presentation at Unified I showed the variance in open rates among the top email blasts from our systems. This weekend I decided to look further and compare the open rates and click through rates of these same email campaigns and there were a few interesting highlights.

There were a few interesting highlights. One large campaign only had a 13% open rate but had a click through rate of 9.1%. This means the majority of people opening were clicking through (70% of the people opening the email responded). It was that statistic that got me to think 'what makes a great email?'. Why do some emails have huge open rates but no click response, and why did this email have a relatively low open rate but had a high percentage of click through.

In unscientific fashion (aka this is my opinion) - here's my list of what makes a great email.

1. Targeted to the recipient it's sent to. This past week I received three emails inviting me to events at wineries in California. The problem is I live in Canada and don't have a chance of attending. There is no substitute for an email that is specific to its audience. The highest open and click through rates on our system come from emails sent to specific lists rather than sent to the entire contact list.

2. A great subject line. You can debate subject line content, but there is no debating that a great subject line prompts a reader to open the email. (There are cool A/B subject line tests here, as well as some pointers on writing great subject lines here).

3. Consistency. One of the best ways to build trust with your customers is to maintain consistency. If you send out weekly or monthly email, don't miss a week or a month. If your from address is always 'info@yourwinery.com' make sure you keep that consistent and keep your style consistent. People who read your email read it for a reason. If you want to try something new, do an A/B test - or target the people who aren't opening your email.

4. A compelling image. You need great photography for a great websites. You need great photography for great emails. (However please don't make your email one giant image - if images are blocked you'll see a low open rate and a low response rate).

5. Short compelling content. Images are often blocked in email so you'll need some text in your email. Make it short, compelling, easy-to-read; short sentences that are broken up into short paragraphs make for easy reading.

6. Single focus.  Again this is an unscientific list, but it's my opinion that customers respond a lot better when there is a single message and it's not overloaded with products.

7. A great incentive and a sense of urgency. People respond to great incentives and to value adds, people also respond when there is a deadline (at least that's how I work).

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So what do you do if you're not producing great email? Use the list above, start slow, ask for feedback, make a few changes here and there, and then move up a gear.

Comments

Paula Sugarman's Gravatar
 
Paula Sugarman
@ Mar 1, 2011 at 3:18 PM
Thanks for the simple and concise list. Your comment about sending to the right target market is particularly well-taken. - Paula

Pamela Heiligenthal's Gravatar
 
Pamela Heiligenthal
@ Mar 1, 2011 at 6:14 PM
Excellent writeup, thanks Andrew. Lots of great take-aways from this post...

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